ART308 ADVANCED STORYBOARD FINAL PROJECT: STORYREEL AND PITCH BIBLE

 

1. PITCH BIBLE/DESIGN WORKBOOK STARTER

2. FINAL STORY REEL 

 

1. PITCH BIBLE/DESIGN WORKBOOK STARTER

 

Click on the images above for an examples of successful Pitch Bibles.

PITCH BIBLE/DESIGN WORKBOOK CHECKLIST:

PITCH BIBLE/DESIGN WORKBOOK DETAILS:

1. Cover/Title Page: Compelling cover Image, working title, name and date. Color optional.

2. Written Treatment: A text document designed to communicate the direction of your project.

PITCH BIBLE/DESIGN WORKBOOK FORMAT:

    Use Adobe InDesign to compile these into a single PDF file.  Print out two hard copies (one for yourself). Submit the PDF file to the Dropbox and bring one of the printed copies to class to turn in.

    Specs:

      • Cover/Title Page
      • Story Treatment
      • Design Workbook Starter
      • 8.5 x 11 landscape orientation
      • 300 DPI BW Printout, Color Cover Sheet, Stapled
      • Submit single PDF file to @Dropbox

    Name: simpsonB_pitchBible_workingTitle_050518.pdf

 

 

2. FINAL STORY REEL 

Click on the images above for an examples of successful Story Reels.

The Storyreel is where you work out the timing of your film to the best of your abilities.  At this point the length of each shot is guesswork, but with the help of a click track, temp audio effects and the judicious use of preliminary score, the Storyreel can be a fairly dependable guide. 

 

STORYREEL CHECKLIST:

 

 

STORYREEL DETAILS:

 

1. Story Panels: These can be created from your Story Thumbnails as sequential jpegs. By importing thumbnails into Storyboard Pro you'll need to redraw each image to refine shots, expand on actions and implement camera moves. Use of strategic tone is highly recommended.

 

2. Temp Audio (or Scratch) Audio:  Preliminary sound effects can be used to communicate audible story queues while temporary musical score can reflect the emotional tone of a given scene while helping to establish an accurate sense of pace.  If no score is intended, it is a good idea to use a muted a click track will help to pace the scene. 

 

3. Click Tracks: To help pace scenes without score (or before you have access to a temp score) use a click track.  Use different tempo tracks to set the pace at different points in your film.  Once the Storyreel is edited, mute the click track for export. 

 

4. Time-code and Shot Beeps: Both SBP and Premiere have a time-code tool to help keep track of your frame counts. A simple Time-code set at 24 fps will do. Wait until your final edit pass to place a shot beep on the hard cuts to help distinguish shot breaks (cuts) from action beats. Be sure to lower the volume to keep the beep just under the radar.

 

 

STORYREEL FORMAT GUIDE:

 

The Storyreel should be exported in 1920 x 1080 and should accurately reflect your vision of a final film. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stephan Leeper/Central Michigan University 2019